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RAILROAD COMPANY v. VANCE.

October 1, 1877

RAILROAD COMPANY
v.
VANCE.



APPEAL from the Circuit Court of the United States for the Southern District of Illinois. The facts are stated in the opinion of the court.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Mr. Justice Harlan delivered the opinion of the court.

Mr. Joseph E. McDonald and Mr. R. P. Ranney for the appellant.

Mr. James K. Edsall, Attorney-General of Illinois, contra.

Upon the filing of the bill in this case by the Indianapolis and St. Louis Railroad Company, suing as a corporation organized under the laws of Indiana, against sundry county tax-collectors in the State of Illinois, a temporary injunction was granted, restraining the defendants from levying on the property, or taking any steps to collect taxes upon the capital stock, of the complainant, for the years 1873, 1874, and 1875, under or by virtue of any warrants in their hands for that purpose.

The defendants, denying that there had been any assessment upon the capital stock of the complainant, insisted that the taxes in question were due upon assessments, rightfully made by the State board of equalization of Illinois upon the capital stock and franchises of an Illinois corporation, the St. Louis, Alton, and Terre Haute Railroad Company, over and above its tangible property, for so much of its main line and the Alton branch thereof as were leased to, and operated in Illinois by, the Indianapolis and St. Louis Railroad Company, to whom, defendants claimed, the taxes in question were, therefore, properly charged.

The cause, by agreement of parties, was submitted upon the pleadings and exhibits filed; and, upon final hearing, a decree was rendered dissolving the injunction and dismissing the bill.

From that decree this appeal is prosecuted.

The essential facts in the case are these: The Constitution of Illinois requires the General Assembly of that State to provide such revenue as may be needful by levying a tax by valuation, so that every person and corporation shall pay a tax in proportion to the value of his, her, or its property,–such valuation to be ascertained by some person or persons to be elected or appointed in such manner as the General Assembly shall direct. Persons or corporations owning or using franchises and privileges are to be taxed in such manner as the General Assembly shall from time to time direct, the tax, however, to be uniform as to the class upon which it operates.

In pursuance of the Constitution, the General Assembly, in the year 1872, passed a general revenue law providing for the assessment of property, and prescribing the mode for the collection of taxes. It contained specific directions for the assessment of the different kinds of property owned by railroad companies, their visible or tangible property to be assessed under the heads of 'railroad track,' 'rolling-stock,' &c. In reference to their capital stock, the statute provided that the 'capital stock of all companies and associations' (other than banking associations organized under the general laws of the State) 'now or hereafter created under the laws of this State shall be so valued by the State board of equalization, as to ascertain and determine respectively the fair cash value of such capital stock, including the franchises, over and above the assessed value of the tangible property of such company or association,'–that value to be ascertained under such rules and principles as the board might deem equitable and just.

The rule adopted by the State board was this: To the market or fair cash value of the shares of capital stock add the market or fair cash value of the debt of the corporation, (excluding that created for current expenses), and from this amount deduct the aggregate amount of the equalized or assessed valuation, as ascertained by the board, of all the tangible property of the corporation; the amount remaining to be taken as the fair cash value of the capital stock, including the franchise, which the board is required to assess against such corporation.

At the annual meetings of the State board held in each of the years 1873, 1874, and 1875, for the purpose of examining the abstracts of property, assessed for taxation in the several counties, as returned to the auditor of State, and for the purpose, also, of equalizing assessments, the question arose as to the mode in which the capital stock of the St. Louis, Alton, and Terre Haute Railroad Company should be assessed for taxation.

The difficulties which attended an intelligent discharge of that duty will be comprehended by a statement of the relations of that corporation to the complainant.

On the 11th of September, 1867, the complainant, by a written contract of lease with the St. Louis, Alton, and Terre Haute Railroad Company, acquired the right and assumed the duty of managing and carrying on, for the term of ninety-nine years, commencing June 1, 1867, the business of the principal or main line of the latter, one hundred and eighty-nine miles in length, extending from Trre Haute, Ind., to East St. Louis, ...


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