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SANTOVINCENZO v. EGAN

decided: November 23, 1931.

SANTOVINCENZO, CONSUL OF THE KINGDOM OF ITALY AT NEW YORK
v.
EGAN, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR, ET AL.



APPEAL FROM THE SURROGATES' COURT OF THE COUNTY OF NEW YORK, STATE OF NEW YORK.

Hughes, Holmes, Van Devanter, McReynolds, Brandeis, Sutherland, Butler, Stone, Roberts

Author: Hughes

[ 284 U.S. Page 34]

 MR. CHIEF JUSTICE HUGHES delivered the opinion of the Court.

Antonio Comincio, a native of Italy, died intestate in New York City sometime prior to March 10, 1925, when letters of administration were issued to the respondent as Public Administrator by the Surrogates' Court of New York County. Upon the judicial settlement of the administrator's account, the appellant, the Consul General of Italy at New York, presented the claim that the decedent at the time of his death was a subject of the King of Italy and had left no heirs or next of kin, and that, under Article XVII of the Consular Convention of 1878 between the United States and Italy, the petitioner was entitled to receive the net assets of the estate for distribution to the Kingdom of Italy. The Attorney General of New York contested the claim. The Surrogates' Court, finding that the domicile of the decedent was in New York City, decreed that the balance of the estate, amounting to $914.64, after payment of debts and the sums allowed as commissions and as expenses of administration, be paid into the treasury of New York City for the use and benefit of the unknown kin of the decedent. The decree was affirmed by the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of the State, First Department, and both the Appellate Division and the Court of Appeals of the State denied leave to appeal to the latter court. The case may

[ 284 U.S. Page 35]

     be regarded as properly here on certiorari. Jud. Code, § 237 (c); U. S. C., Tit. 28, § 344 (c).

There is no controversy as to the facts. The decedent was never naturalized, and at the time of his death was an Italian subject. He had lived in New York for many years, and the finding that the decedent was domiciled there is not open to question. Nor were any heirs or next of kin discovered. The testimony introduced on behalf of the Italian Consul General, which was undisputed, stated that the decedent had no relatives, and the decree of the Surrogates' Court recited that next of kin were unknown. The decree was made pursuant to c. 230 of the Laws of New York of 1898. The Surrogate said in his opinion: "Pursuant to our statutes this amount would be directed in the decree to be paid into the city treasury of the City of New York to await ascertainment of the next of kin. Ultimately the amount would find its way into the treasury of the State of New York."

The provision of the Consular Convention between the United States and Italy, under which the claim of the Italian Consul General was made, provides (20 Stat. 725, 732):

"Article XVII. The respective Consuls General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls and Consular Agents, as likewise the Consular Chancellors, Secretaries, Clerks or Attaches, shall enjoy in both countries, all the rights, prerogatives, immunities and privileges which are or may hereafter be granted to the officers of the same grade, of the most favoured nation."

Pursuant to this agreement, the Italian Consul General sought the application of Article VI of the Treaty between the United States and Persia of 1856, as follows (11 Stat. 709, 710):

"Article VI. In case of a citizen or subject of either of the contracting parties dying within the territories of the other, his effects shall be delivered up integrally to

[ 284 U.S. Page 36]

     the family or partners in business of the deceased; and in case he has no relations or partners, his effects in either country shall be delivered up to the consul or agent of the nation of which the deceased was a subject or citizen, so that ...


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