Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

IN RE WORLDS OF WONDER SECS. LITIG.

March 5, 1993

In Re WORLDS OF WONDER SECURITIES LITIGATION; This Document Relates To: ALL ACTIONS

Conti


The opinion of the court was delivered by: SAMUEL CONTI

I. INTRODUCTION

 II. STANDARD OF REVIEW ON MOTIONS TO RECONSIDER

 This court has the inherent power to modify or change its orders to correct a mistake or error. 6A Moore's Federal Practice P 59.07 (1991). However, a motion for reconsideration is not the proper vehicle for revisiting issues that were decided, Van Skiver v. United states, 952 F.2d 1241, 1243 (10th Cir. 1991), or for a "recapitulation of the cases and arguments considered by the court" before rendering its original decision," Starr v. JCI Data Processing Inc., 767 F. Supp. 633, 635 (D.N.J. 1991). The party moving for reconsideration must show more than a disagreement with the court's decision; the court should not grant the motion unless there is a need to correct a clear error of law or prevent manifest injustice. See Kern-Tulare Water District v. City of Bakersfield, 634 F. Supp. 656, 665 (E.D. Cal. 1986), aff'd in part and rev'd in part on other grounds, 828 F.2d 514, cert. denied, 486 U.S. 1015, 100 L. Ed. 2d 214, 108 S. Ct. 1752 (1988).

 III. DISCUSSION

 Plaintiffs filed two separate motions to reconsider. Plaintiffs filed a "Motion for Reconsideration and Alteration and Amendment of Judgment in Favor of Officer and Director Defendants and Defendant Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co., Inc." In this motion, plaintiffs ask the court to reopen the case to reconsider issues that the court already decided. Specifically, they ask the court to reconsider its application of the "bespeaks caution" doctrine, and to reevaluate each of plaintiffs' contentions that certain statements in or omissions from WOW's prospectuses misled investors. This motion presents no new issues of law or fact. Therefore, the court denies this motion in its entirety.

 Plaintiffs also filed a "Motion for Reconsideration and Alteration and Amendment of Judgment in Favor of Defendant Deloitte and Touche." Again, this motion presents no newly discovered facts or law showing that the court's Order was in error. Plaintiffs simply challenge the court's analysis. However, the court believes that some clarification of its Order would be helpful to the parties.

 A. The "Loss Causation" Defense of Section 11(e)

 To recall, Deloitte & Touche ("Deloitte") was WOW's independent auditing firm. Deloitte prepared and certified the financial statements WOW included in the prospectus for its debenture offering (the "Debenture Prospectus"). WOW's debentures greatly decreased in value after WOW defaulted on its first interest payment to debenture holders and declared bankruptcy.

 The plaintiff subclass of debenture holders claims it is entitled to damages under Section 11 of the Securities Act of 1933, 15 U.S.C. § 77k. According to plaintiffs, the financial statements in the Debenture Prospectus overstated WOW's net revenues for fiscal 1987 by 14.3%. *fn2" Deloitte allegedly violated Section 11 by allowing this misleading information to appear in the Debenture Prospectus with Deloitte's certification.

 Section 11(e) allows a prevailing plaintiff "to recover such damages as shall represent the difference between the amount paid for the security . . . and (1) the value thereof at the time such suit was brought, or (2) the price at which such security shall have been disposed of in the market before suit . . . ." 15 U.S.C. § 77k(e). However, Section 11(e) allows a defendant to avoid liability by proving that the decline in the price of the security resulted from factors "other than the depreciation in value of such security resulting from such part of the registration statement, with respect to which his liability is being asserted, not being true." Id.

 This court granted summary judgment to Deloitte based on its Section 11(e) "loss causation" defense. *fn3" (Order at 41.) The court held that the market price of WOW's debentures declined for reasons other than the alleged overstatement of revenues by Deloitte. The court found that Deloitte's alleged errors never were disclosed to the public. Since there was no public disclosure of the fact that WOW's 1987 revenues may have been overstated; the market could not possibly have reacted. (See Order at 38-41.) The court found instead that the debentures declined in value because the market discovered that WOW was barely liquid, and faced increasing difficulties in selling its products. (Order at 39.)

 Plaintiffs contend, as they did in opposing Deloitte's motion for summary judgment, that they purchased the debentures at an artificially high price due to the market's reliance on Deloitte's alleged errors. Therefore, when WOW collapsed, plaintiffs suffered a greater loss than they otherwise would ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.