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MORENO v. SUMMIT ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION

October 6, 2005.

JOSE MORENO as CHAIRMAN and LARRY TOTTEN as CO-CHAIRMAN of the BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR THE LABORERS HEALTH AND WELFARE TRUST FUND FOR NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, LABORERS VACATION-HOLIDAY TRUST FUND FOR NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, and LABORERS TRAINING AND RETRAINING TRUST FUND FOR NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, Plaintiffs,
v.
SUMMIT ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION, INC., and GARY RICHARD BROWN, an individual, and ERIK BURDAN, an individual, Defendants.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: WILLIAM ALSUP, District Judge

ORDER GRANTING IN PART AND DENYING IN PART PLAINTIFFS' APPLICATION FOR DEFAULT JUDGMENT
INTRODUCTION
In this action alleging breach of a collective bargaining agreement, plaintiffs Jose Moreno and Larry Totten, acting as co-chairmen of the board of trustees for several laborers' trust funds (collectively "Trust Funds"), apply for default judgment against defendant Summit Electrical Construction, Inc. Summit has never responded to this lawsuit in any way. Plaintiff's application is therefore GRANTED IN PART. Summit is ORDERED to pay a total of $42,915.54 to plaintiffs and to submit to an audit, as detailed below. The Court reserves jurisdiction over the case to enforce the injunction, and to entertain any motions to increase the judgment if the audit reveals other liabilities or to award additional attorney's fees. The Court DENIES the motions for a judgment declaring that plaintiffs are entitled to attorney's fees and costs to enforce this judgment, and for an order on post-judgment interest. No part of this order is a judgment or injunction enforceable against defendants Gary Brown or Erik Burdan, individually.

STATEMENT

  On March 17, 2005, plaintiffs filed this Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) action. They alleged breach of a collective bargaining agreement by Summit and Gary Brown. The complaint was amended July 25, 2005, adding Erik Burdan as another defendant. Plaintiffs sought unpaid contributions of $24,406.69 to funds that provide workers with health, vacation, holiday, pension and training benefits. They also wanted the Court to order defendants to allow the Trust Funds to inspect their records and thus determine how much more the defendants may owe. Plaintiffs additionally asked for liquidated damages ($3,000), court costs ($857.92), attorney's fees ($12,847.50) and interest ($1,803.43).

  Plaintiffs allege the following facts. The trust funds are third-party beneficiaries to a collective bargaining agreement between the Northern California District Council of Laborers and an employer association that represents construction-industry employers doing business in Northern California. Summit became a signatory to the agreement about March 2, 2001. That agreement never was terminated. It bound Summit to pay trust-fund contributions each month, $150 in liquidated damages each time they did not make a monthly contribution on time and certain attorney's fees and costs in the event of a delinquency.

  Defendant failed to pay $24,406.69 for the months of December 2004, and January and February 2005. Liquidated damages grew $150 for late payment between April 2003 and March 2005. Interest accrued at a monthly rate of 1.5 percent of the delinquent-contribution amount.

  On June 15, 2005, the Clerk of the Court entered default as to Summit.

  ANALYSIS In deciding whether to enter default judgment, courts deem true all well-pleaded allegations in the complaint, except those related to the amount of damages. Geddes v. United Fin. Group, 559 F.2d 557, 560 (9th Cir. 1977).

  When a party does not defend against a claim for affirmative relief, the clerk must enter the party's default. FRCP 55(a). Upon such a failure to defend, the court then may enter, in its discretion, a judgment by default. Yew v. Dulles, 236 F.2d 415, 416 (9th Cir. 1956). In making its decision, the court may consider seven factors set forth in Eitel v. McCool:
(1) the possibility of prejudice to the plaintiff, (2) the merits of the plaintiff's substantive claim, (3) the sufficiency of the complaint, (4) the sum of money at stake in the action, (5) the possibility of a dispute concerning material facts, (6) whether the default was due to excusable neglect, and (7) the strong policy underlying the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure favoring decisions on the merits.
782 F.2d 1470, 1471-72 (9th Cir. 1986).

  1. Eitel Factors Applied

  The complaint is sufficient because it states the grounds upon which the Court's jurisdiction depends, states a claim for breach of a collective-bargaining agreement which would entitle plaintiffs to relief, and demands a money judgment and an order for injunctive relief (Amended Compl.). See also FRCP 8(a).

  There is no reason to question the merits of plaintiffs' substantive claims. According to the undisputed record, Summit has failed to pay money it owes and has agreed to submit to an audit in circumstances such as this.

  Denying the Trust Funds' application would leave the plaintiffs without a remedy.

  In general, the fact that a large sum of money is at stake is a factor disfavoring default judgment. Cf. Eitel, 782 F.2d at 1472 (stating that the fact that $3 million was at stake, when considered in light of the parties' dispute as to material facts, supported the court's decision not to enter judgment by default). The Trust Funds have asked for a damages of $42,915.54. That amount pales beside the $3 million at stake in Eitel.

  Indications that there is a dispute of material fact weigh against entry of default judgment. Eitel, 782 F.2d at 1471-72. Summit has defaulted and the Court therefore must take as true all well-pleaded allegations in the ...


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