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Andia v. Full Service Travel

November 29, 2007

ANA MARIA ANDIA, M.D., PLAINTIFF, ORDER
v.
FULL SERVICE TRAVEL, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, CELEBRITY CRUISES, INC., A FOREIGN CORPORATION, AND ARNOTT'S LODGE AND HIKE ADVENTURES, A HAWAIIAN BUSINESS OF UNKNOWN STRUCTURE, DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Hayes, Judge

The matter before the Court is Defendants' Motion for Summary Judgment, filed by Celebrity Cruises, Inc. and Arnott's Lodge and Hike Adventures. (Doc. # 40).

Background

Defendant Celebrity Cruises, Inc. ("Celebrity") is engaged in the business of providing passenger cruises to various destinations.*fn1 UMF 1. Arnott's Lodge and Hike Adventures ("Arnott's") guides transport cruise ship passengers to Volcanoes National Park ("the Park"), and provide knowledge about where the lava flow is each day. UMF 3.

In order to view the active lava flow, individuals must hike over cooled lava. This terrain is rugged and natural, consisting of uneven surfaces. Id. at 4; DMF 4. The Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Rangers ("Rangers") place reflective markers and cones on the lava to be used by hikers as reference points. UMF 7.

In November, 2005, Plaintiff Ana Maria Andia, M.D. was a passenger on Defendant Celebrity Cruises, Inc.'s ("Celebrity") passenger cruise ship. Plaintiff is an experienced hiker. Andia Depo, 35: 23-25. On November 27, 2005, Plaintiff signed up to participate in a shore expedition known as the HL 15, the Kilauea Lava Viewing Hike, guided by Arnott's. UMF 8. On November 27, 2005, there was total visibility for many miles in every direction. Id. at 5.

Prior to beginning the hike, Plaintiff read the description of the hike that states: "This tour involves approximately two to six miles of hiking over very sharp and uneven surfaces." Id. at 10. Plaintiff also read, understood and executed the "Lava Hike Participant, Release and Acknowledgment of Risk" ("Agreement"), which provides, in relevant part:

I agree not to hold Arnott's liable for any accident or injury beyond its control.

The hike to the Lava is conducted at a brisk pace and requires physically fit participants in good health who can readily hike on varied surfaces and elevation changes for extended periods. I, as a participant, acknowledge that I am taking this activity of my own free will and that I will not hold Arnott's responsible for any injury incurred while . . . I am hiking on the paved or natural surfaces of the National Park . . . . I understand by reading this waiver that Arnott's guides will provide only broad direction and safety guidelines and that I remain responsible for the actual path hiked and whether I choose to take the risks with possibly still hot Lava Flows.

Id. at 11. Plaintiff also received and read a document entitled "Arnotts Adventures proudly presents: The Kilauea Lava Hike Adventure" ("Brochure"), which informed Plaintiff that she may need to turn around and head back to the Rangers station alone, and that she did not need a trail to return safely. Id. at 14.

Prior to beginning the hike, Arnott's informed Plaintiff that the lava flow had changed and that the hike was going to be longer than anticipated for that day. Id. at 13. Arnott's also informed all participants in the hike, including Plaintiff, that they had the option of staying at the Rangers station and not going on the hike, and that there would be four decision points during the hike at which hikers could turn around and head back to the Rangers station. Id. at 13, 18.

Prior to beginning the hike, Plaintiff understood that the marked trail was merely a preferred route, and that the trail was not necessary to safely return to the Rangers station. UMF 15; Andia Depo, 63:1-15. Plaintiff also understood that guides would not stay with her during the hike and that she might be returning to the Rangers station unaccompanied. UMF 15, 16; Andia Depo, 63: 1-15, 64:22-24. Plaintiff understood that the hike would be difficult and strenuous. Andia Depo, 52: 17-19

For the first 30 minutes of the hike, and through the first two decision points, the hike proceeded on paved surfaces. UMF 20. During this period, Plaintiff recalls seeing reflective tabs on the paved surface. Id. Plaintiff's companion recalls seeing reflective tabs stuck to the rocks for 10-15 minutes of the hike after leaving the paved road. Plaintiff does not recall whether or not the reflective tabs were stuck to the rocks. Id. at 21. Approximately 45 minutes into the hike, and after approximately 15 minutes of walking on unpaved terrain, Plaintiff decided to return, unaccompanied by a guide, to the Rangers station. Id. at 22. About 15 minutes into her return, Plaintiff slipped on one of the rocks. When Plaintiff slipped, she twisted her ankle. Plaintiff then lifted her foot up, and hit the top of her foot on the lava rock. As a result of these events, Plaintiff fractured her foot. Id. at 23. Plaintiff testified that she then proceeded back to the Rangers station. Andia Depo, 86:22-87:14. The fall itself could have caused the fracture to become displaced and surgery may have been required regardless of whether Plaintiff attempted to walk out of the lava fields. UMF 25. Plaintiff was given the option of going to the ship's doctor or the Hilo emergency room for treatment, and Plaintiff elected to receive treatment with the ship's doctor. Id. at 24; Andia Depo, 89:15-25; 90:1-10. Plaintiff testified that, as a result of the fracture, she was confined to a wheel chair for a period of months, had to take time off of work, and suffers impaired balance. Id. 15:13-14.

On February 24, 2006, Plaintiff filed the First Amendment Complaint ("FAC") against Defendants Full Service Travel,*fn2 Celebrity and Arnott's. (Doc. # 3). The FAC alleges causes of action against Arnott's for (1) negligence, on grounds that Arnott's breached its duty of care to Plaintiff by failing to ensure the safety of participants in their excursions, and (2) negligence, on grounds that Arnott's failed to warn Plaintiff of the known dangers and risks associated with the lava hike. The FAC alleges causes of action against Celebrity for (1) negligence, on grounds that Celebrity breached its duty of care to Plaintiff by failing to to offer reasonably reliable and safe excursions, and (2) negligence, on grounds that Celebrity failed to warn Plaintiff of the dangers and risks associated with the lava hike.

On August 18, 2007, Defendants filed the Motion for Summary Judgment, pursuant to Rule 56 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Defendants claim they are entitled to judgment as a matter of law because (1) Arnott's owed Plaintiff no duty to protect Plaintiff against the assumed risk of slipping and falling on the lava rock, (2) Arnott's owed Plaintiff no duty to warn Plaintiff of the obvious risk of injury of slipping and falling on the lava rock, (3) Celebrity did not owe Plaintiff a duty to warn of the obvious risk of slipping and falling on lava rock, (4) the alleged negligence of Defendants did not cause Plaintiff's injuries, and (5) the ...


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