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Gaspard v. McGuinness

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA


November 11, 2008

ARTHUR GASPARD, PLAINTIFF,
v.
WILLIAM J. MCGUINNESS, ET AL., DEFENDANTS.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Dennis L. Beck United States Magistrate Judge

ORDER STRIKING COMPLAINT (Doc. 1) ORDER REQUIRING PLAINTIFF TO FILE SIGNED AMENDED COMPLAINT WITHIN 30 DAYS

This is a civil action filed by plaintiff Arthur Gaspard ("plaintiff"), a state prisoner proceeding pro se and in forma pauperis. Plaintiff filed his complaint on April 28, 2008.

Plaintiff's complaint is unsigned and the Court shall strike his complaint. Local Rule 7-131(b). F.R.C.P. 11(a). It also appears that a page from his complaint is missing.

Although the Court shall strike plaintiff's complaint, the Court has undertaken a cursory review of plaintiff's complaint and wishes to provide plaintiff with the following directions, to assist him in preparing his amended complaint..

First, with respect to exhibits, while they are permissible if incorporated by reference, Fed. R. Civ. P. 10(c), they are not necessary in the federal system of notice pleading, Fed. R. Civ. P. 8(a). The Court strongly suggests to Plaintiff that they should not be submitted where (1) they serve only to confuse the record and burden the Court, or (2) they are intended as future evidence. If this action reaches a juncture at which the submission of evidence is appropriate and necessary (e.g., summary judgment or trial), Plaintiff will have the opportunity at that time to submit his evidence.

Second, in his amended complaint, plaintiff must specifically link the conduct of each defendant with the alleged deprivation. Under section 1983, Plaintiff is required to show that Defendants (1) acted under color of state law, and (2) committed conduct which deprived Plaintiff of a federal right. Hydrick v. Hunter, 500 F.3d 978, 987 (9th Cir. 2007). "A person deprives another of a constitutional right, where that person'does an affirmative act, participates in another's affirmative acts, or omits to perform an act which [that person] is legally required to do that causes the deprivation of which complaint is made.'" Id. at 988 (quoting Johnson v. Duffy, 588 F.2d 740, 743 (9th Cir. 1978)). "[T]he'requisite causal connection can be established not only by some kind of direct, personal participation in the deprivation, but also by setting in motion a series of acts by others which the actor knows or reasonably should know would cause others to inflict the constitutional injury.'" Id. (quoting Johnson at 743-44).

Third, "[A prison] grievance procedure is a procedural right only, it does not confer any substantive right upon the inmates." Buckley v. Barlow, 997 F.2d 494, 495 (8th Cir. 1993) (citing Azeez v. DeRobertis, 568 F. Supp. 8, 10 (N.D. Ill. 1982)); see also Ramirez v. Galaza, 334 F.3d 850, 860 (9th Cir. 2003) (no liberty interest in processing of appeals because no entitlement to a specific grievance procedure); Massey v. Helman, 259 F.3d 641, 647 (7th Cir. 2001) (existence of grievance procedure confers no liberty interest on prisoner); Mann v. Adams, 855 F.2d 639, 640 (9th Cir. 1988). Actions in reviewing prisoner's administrative appeal cannot serve as the basis for liability under a section 1983 action. Buckley, 997 F.2d at 495.

Finally, it appears that plaintiff's allegations concern the medical treatment received for his diabetes. In drafting his amended complaint, plaintiff is advised that to constitute cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the Eighth Amendment, prison conditions must involve "the wanton and unnecessary infliction of pain." Rhodes v. Chapman, 452 U.S. 337, 347 (1981). A prisoner's claim of inadequate medical care does not rise to the level of an Eighth Amendment violation unless (1) "the prison official deprived the prisoner of the'minimal civilized measure of life's necessities,'" and (2) "the prison official'acted with deliberate indifference in doing so.'" Toguchi v. Chung, 391 F.3d 1051, 1057 (9th Cir. 2004) (quoting Hallett v. Morgan, 296 F.3d 732, 744 (9th Cir. 2002) (citation omitted)). A prison official does not act in a deliberately indifferent manner unless the official "knows of and disregards an excessive risk to inmate health or safety." Farmer v. Brennan, 511 U.S. 825, 834 (1994). Deliberate indifference may be manifested "when prison officials deny, delay or intentionally interfere with medical treatment," or in the manner "in which prison physicians provide medical care." McGuckin v. Smith, 974 F.2d 1050, 1059 (9th Cir. 1992), overruled on other grounds, WMX Techs., Inc. v. Miller, 104 F.3d 1133, 1136 (9th Cir. 1997) (en banc). Where a prisoner is alleging a delay in receiving medical treatment, the delay must have led to further harm in order for the prisoner to make a claim of deliberate indifference to serious medical needs. McGuckin, 974 F.2d at 1060 (citing Shapely v. Nevada Bd. of State Prison Comm'rs, 766 F.2d 404, 407 (9th Cir. 1985)).

In conclusion, Plaintiff's complaint is HEREBY STRICKEN. The Clerk's Office shall send to Plaintiff a complaint form, and Plaintiff shall file a signed and complete amended complaint within thirty (30) days of service of this order.

Failure to comply with this order will result in a recommendation that this action be dismissed for failure to obey a court order.

IT IS SO ORDERED.

20081111

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