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Rodriguez v. Dixon

January 22, 2009

NASARIO RODRIGUEZ, PLAINTIFF,
v.
SERGEANT DIXON, ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Gregory G. Hollows United States Magistrate Judge

ORDER

Plaintiff is a state prisoner proceeding pro se. He seeks relief pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983 and has requested authority pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1915 to proceed in forma pauperis. This proceeding was referred to this court by Local Rule 72-302 pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 636(b)(1). This case was originally filed in the Northern District on February 2, 2006, then transferred and filed in this court, on February 15, 2006. This complaint remained unscreened for nearly three years because it was never properly processed by this court's Clerk's Office. When this case was finally and very belatedly brought to the attention of this court, the undersigned acted immediately to screen it.

Plaintiff has submitted a declaration that makes the showing required by 28 U.S.C. § 1915(a). Accordingly, the request to proceed in forma pauperis will be granted.

Although the current statutory filing fee is $350.00, plaintiff will only be required to pay the applicable filing fee at the time that this action was filed, which is $250.00. 28 U.S.C. §§ 1914(a), 1915(b)(1). Plaintiff has been without funds for six months and is currently without funds. Accordingly, the court will not assess an initial partial filing fee. 28 U.S.C. § 1915(b)(1). Plaintiff is obligated to make monthly payments of twenty percent of the preceding month's income credited to plaintiff's prison trust account. These payments shall be collected and forwarded by the appropriate agency to the Clerk of the Court each time the amount in plaintiff's account exceeds $10.00, until the filing fee is paid in full. 28 U.S.C. § 1915(b)(2).

The court is required to screen complaints brought by prisoners seeking relief against a governmental entity or officer or employee of a governmental entity. 28 U.S.C. § 1915A(a). The court must dismiss a complaint or portion thereof if the prisoner has raised claims that are legally "frivolous or malicious," that fail to state a claim upon which relief may be granted, or that seek monetary relief from a defendant who is immune from such relief. 28 U.S.C. § 1915A(b)(1),(2).

A claim is legally frivolous when it lacks an arguable basis either in law or in fact. Neitzke v. Williams, 490 U.S. 319, 325 (1989); Franklin v. Murphy, 745 F.2d 1221, 1227-28 (9th Cir. 1984). The court may, therefore, dismiss a claim as frivolous where it is based on an indisputably meritless legal theory or where the factual contentions are clearly baseless. Neitzke, 490 U.S. at 327. The critical inquiry is whether a constitutional claim, however inartfully pleaded, has an arguable legal and factual basis. See Jackson v. Arizona, 885 F.2d 639, 640 (9th Cir. 1989); Franklin, 745 F.2d at 1227.

A complaint must contain more than a "formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action;" it must contain factual allegations sufficient to "raise a right to relief above the speculative level." Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 127 S.Ct. 1955, 1965 (2007). "The pleading must contain something more...than...a statement of facts that merely creates a suspicion [of] a legally cognizable right of action." Id., quoting 5 C. Wright & A. Miller, Federal Practice and Procedure 1216, pp. 235-235 (3d ed. 2004). In reviewing a complaint under this standard, the court must accept as true the allegations of the complaint in question, Hospital Bldg. Co. v. Rex Hospital Trustees, 425 U.S. 738, 740 (1976), construe the pleading in the light most favorable to the plaintiff, and resolve all doubts in the plaintiff's favor. Jenkins v. McKeithen, 395 U.S. 411, 421 (1969).

Plaintiff states that on 12/23/04, plaintiff was permitted access to the administrative segregation (Ad Seg) yard "with extreme ice on the yard." Complaint, p. 9. No precautionary measures were taken to prevent slipping or falls, resulting in plaintiff's injuring his back and left knee when he slipped on the ice. Id.

Defendant Dr. Wong informed plaintiff that his back and knee were not injured, but numerous subsequent medical procedures/actions have "proved Dr. Wong wrong." Id. Plaintiff states, at least at the time of his writing the complaint, that he was scheduled for knee surgery and awaiting radiology reports concerning his back to find out if he needed back surgery. Id.

Plaintiff asserts that "the Lassen CDC medical staff" have repeatedly denied him pain killers when they have been asked and that the Solano Medical Staff has attempted to discourage plaintiff from filing accident reports "stating that it would be useless."

Plaintiff lists the following as defendants: Sergeant (Sgt. Dixon) of the Lassen Yard Ad Seg Unit; Dr. Wong in Lassen Yard; Lassen Yard CDC Medical Staff; Solano State Prison Medical Staff.

As to plaintiff's claims regarding the ice on the Ad Seg yard, creating dangerous conditions, plaintiff fails to ascribe the failure to warn of the icy conditions to any individual within his allegations. It is not enough to simply separately set down the name of a correctional sergeant associated with an Ad. Seg. Unit. There can be no liability under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 unless there is some affirmative link or connection between a defendant's actions and the claimed deprivation. Rizzo v. Goode, 423 U.S. 362 (1976); May v. Enomoto, 633 F.2d 164, 167 (9th Cir. 1980); Johnson v. Duffy, 588 F.2d 740, 743 (9th Cir. 1978). This claim will be dismissed but plaintiff will be granted leave to amend.

As to plaintiff's claims against defendant Dr. Wong, plaintiff must be more specific in alleging an Eighth Amendment violation for inadequate medical care based on this defendant's apparent diagnosis and/or inaction. In order to state a § 1983 claim for violation of the Eighth Amendment based on inadequate medical care, plaintiff must allege "acts or omissions sufficiently harmful to evidence deliberate indifference to serious medical needs." Estelle v. Gamble, 429 U.S. 97, 106, 97 S.Ct. 285, 292 (1976). To prevail, plaintiff must show both that his medical needs were objectively serious, and that defendants possessed a sufficiently culpable state of mind. Wilson v. Seiter, 501 U.S. 294, 299, 111 S.Ct. 2321, 2324 (1991); McKinney v. Anderson, 959 F.2d 853 (9th Cir. 1992) (on remand). The requisite state of mind for a medical claim is "deliberate indifference." Hudson v. McMillian, 503 U.S. 1, 4, 112 S.Ct. 995, 998 (1992).

A serious medical need exists if the failure to treat a prisoner's condition could result in further significant injury or the unnecessary and wanton infliction of pain. Indications that a prisoner has a serious need for medical treatment are the following: the existence of an injury that a reasonable doctor or patient would find important and worthy of comment or treatment; the presence of a medical condition that significantly affects an individual's daily activities; or the existence of chronic and substantial pain. See, e.g., Wood v. Housewright, 900 F. 2d 1332, 1337-41 (9th Cir. 1990) (citing cases); Hunt v. Dental Dept., 865 F.2d 198, 200-01 (9th ...


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