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Anaya v. Campbell

November 9, 2009

RICHARD ANAYA, PLAINTIFF,
v.
ROSEANNE CAMPBELL, ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Gregory G. Hollows United States Magistrate Judge

FINDINGS & RECOMMENDATIONS

I. Introduction

Plaintiff is a state prisoner proceeding pro se with a civil rights action pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983. Pending before the court is the motion for judgment on the pleadings and to dismiss filed August 17, 2009, pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(b) and 12(c) on behalf of defendants Smith, Casperite, Hamilton, Felker, Subia, Hoepner, Perez, James, Hale, Clark, Tedder, Akintola, Williams, Agyeman, Nale, Campbell, Huerta-Garcia, Johnson and Grannis.*fn1

For the following reasons, the court recommends that defendants' motion be granted in part and denied in part.

II. Failure to Exhaust Administrative Remedies

Pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(b), defendants move to dismiss the claims against all defendants but for Smith and Williams on grounds that plaintiff failed to exhaust administrative remedies. For the following reasons, the court finds that this motion is untimely brought.

Background

Plaintiff filed the original complaint in this action on January 5, 2007, alleging violations of his civil rights and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) at Mule Creek State Prison (MCSP), where he was housed. Plaintiff alleged that he had been denied adequate medical care for knee problems and a rectal prolapse. Plaintiff alleged that he had been denied knee surgery, a walking cane, grab bars, crutches, a single cell due, cell meals and a raised toilet seat. Plaintiff also alleged that defendants were improperly requiring him to use public restrooms. Plaintiff also claimed that he had not been given an adequate job assignment. On April 11, 2007, the court ordered service of defendants Smith, Grannis, Tedder, Nale, Campbell, Akintola, Garcia, Johnson, Reaves, Reyes and Kinnick.*fn2

On August 23, 2007, defendants first appeared in this action by filing a motion to dismiss pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(b)(6). On December 5, 2007, the court recommended that defendants' motion be denied as to the claims against Smith. The court ordered the motion granted with leave to amend as to the claims against the other defendants.

On November 21, 2007, plaintiff filed a notice of change of address indicating his transfer to High Desert State Prison (HDSP).

On May 29, 2008, plaintiff filed an amended complaint consisting of two separately filed documents, court file nos. 86 and 88. The amended complaint names Grannis, Tedder, Nale, Campbell, Akintola, Garcia and Johnson as defendants. Newly named as defendants were Subia, Hamilton, Casperite, Hoepner, Williams, Cullen, Felker, Perez, Hale, James, Agyeman and Clark. The amended complaint included allegations regarding conditions at MCSP and HDSP. The claims against the newly named defendants at HDSP were similar to those raised against the defendants located at MCSP.

On June 26, 2008, the court ordered the original defendants to answer the amended complaint and ordered service of the new defendants. On August 26, 2008, the original defendants filed an answer to the amended complaint. On November 4, 2008, newly named defendants Casperite, Felker, Hamilton, Hoepner, James, Perez and Subia filed an answer to the amended complaint.

On November 10, 2008, the court issued a scheduling order setting the dispositive motion cut-off date for June 19, 2009. On January 22, 2009, newly named defendants Hale, Clark, Agyeman and Williams filed an answer to the amended complaint.

On February 27, 2009, defendants filed a motion to modify the scheduling order. Defendants requested that the court extend the discovery cut-off and dispositive motion filing dates because new defense counsel had been assigned. On March 13, 2009, the court granted this motion, and re-set the dispositive motion cut-off date to August 19, 2009.

On August 17, 2009, defendants filed the pending motion to dismiss and for judgment on the pleadings.

Analysis 42 U.S.C. § 1997e(a) provides that, "[n]o action shall be brought with respect to prison conditions under [42 U.S.C. § 1983], or any other Federal law, by a prisoner confined in any jail, prison, or other correctional facility until such administrative remedies as are available are exhausted."

Defendants' motion for failure to exhaust administrative remedies is brought pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P.12(b).

Under Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(b), as to the specifically enumerated grounds 1 through 7, the rule announces that "[a] motion asserting any of these defenses must be made before pleading if a responsive pleading is allowed." This court finds that although this motion is one that is brought under the nonenumerated grounds of Rule 12(b), that, similarly, such a motion, generally, is timely when it, too, is brought prior to the filing of an answer. This is so because defendants have ready access to the CDCR records, or lack thereof, to support the motion and, if they do not, they have the means to seek an extension of time before filing an answer from the court to be permitted to gather the requisite information.

Moreover, the MCSP defendants appeared in this action two years ago. Since that time, the MCSP defendants have filed a motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim pursuant to Fed. R Civ. P. 12(b)(6) and an answer. The court has spent considerable resources on this action since that time.

Seven of the newly named HDSP defendants filed their answer nine months before the pending motion was filed. The other three newly named HDSP defendants on whose behalf the pending motion is brought filed their answer seven months before this motion was filed. Since the filing of the answers, considerable court time and resources have been spent on this action. For example, on March 24, 2009, and August 3, 2009, the court issued orders denying three motions to compel filed by plaintiff. Had defendants timely filed their motion to dismiss, the court most likely would not have had to devote the extensive time and resources it did to evaluating these motions.

This court has not been able to uncover any binding and conclusive authority on the issuance of the timeliness, or lack thereof, of a nonenumerated 12(b) motion; however, the undersigned finds that the reasoning set forth in a federal court in the Central District of California, where the district judge found defendant's motion to dismiss for nonexhaustion of administrative remedies, filed some ten months after the filing of the answer, untimely, best encapsulates the position of the undersigned:

Moving Defendant cites no case law which indicates that the issue of exhaustion of administrative remedies may only be raised through a motion for summary judgment. On the contrary, the Ninth Circuit has repeatedly found that "failure to exhaust non-judicial remedies is a matter in abatement, not going to the merits of the claim, and as such is not properly raised in a motion for summary judgment." Ritza v. International Longshoremen's And Warehousemen's Union, et al., 837 F.2d 365, 368 (9th Cir.1988) (citation omitted); Inlandboatmens Union of the Pacific v. Dutra Group, 279 F.3d 1075, 1083 (9th Cir.2002) ("We have held that a failure to exhaust non-judicial remedies must be raised in a motion to dismiss, and should be treated as such even if raised as part of a motion for summary judgment.")

Under previously existing Ninth Circuit case law, Moving Defendant should have brought his challenge to Plaintiff's claims based on failure to exhaust administrative remedies through a timely motion to dismiss rather than a motion for summary judgment.

The Ninth Circuit allows a Rule 12(b) motion any time before the responsive pleading is filed. See Aetna Life Ins. Co. v. Alla Medical Services, Inc., 855 F.2d 1470, 1474 (9th Cir.1988) (citing Bechtel v. Liberty Nat'l Bank, 534 F.2d 1335, 1340-41 (9th Cir.1976) (In Bechtel, the Ninth Circuit noted that "while some courts hold that Rule 12(b) motions must be made within 20 days of service of the complaint, the rule itself only requires that such motions 'be made before pleading if a further pleading is permitted." ')

Thomas v. Baca, 2003 WL 504755, *2 (C.D. Cal. 2003) [emphasis added].

While, of course, defendants have not brought this motion technically within a motion for summary judgment, but, instead have brought it two days before the dispositive motion cut-off date, the reasoning is no less apposite. The undersigned is aware of conflicting decisions at the district court level within this circuit, see, e.g., Rigsby v. Schriro, 2008 WL 2705376, *1 n. 2 (D. Ariz. 2008) (finding that, where defendant simultaneously filed an answer -- asserting the failure to exhaust defense -- and an unenumerated motion to dismiss for failure to exhaust administrative remedies, such a motion "need not be made before answering"); Tyner v. Schriro, 2008 WL 752612, *1 n. 1 (D. Ariz. 2008) (same); see also, Thrasher v. Garland, 2007 WL 3012615 *2 (W.D. Wash. 2007) (asserting that, although a motion to dismiss pursuant to the specifically enumerated grounds of Rule 12(b) should be brought before the answer is filed, a nonenumerated 12(b) motion "need not necessarily be brought prior to the filing of the answer."

However, this court finds the reasoning of Thomas v. Baca, supra, to better promote judicial efficiency and economy while at the same time limiting unfair prejudice to a pro se prisoner plaintiff. As noted, the state attorney general has virtually unlimited access to CDCR records. Defendants' counsel makes no effort whatever to explain why such a motion could not have been brought prior to the filing of the answer on behalf of these defendants, and prior to the time when this court had expended resources adjudicating discovery disputes and several motions for injunctive relief as well as other matters. Nor is the question of exhaustion, or lack thereof, of administrative remedies a jurisdictional one. Wyatt v. Terhune, 315 F.3d 1108, 1119 n. ...


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