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Kenny Lynn Warren v. Domingo Uribe

July 12, 2011

KENNY LYNN WARREN, PETITIONER,
v.
DOMINGO URIBE, JR., RESPONDENT.



ORDER

Petitioner, a state prisoner without counsel, seeks a writ of habeas corpus. See 28 U.S.C. § 2254. Respondent moves to dismiss the petition, filed on August 20, 2010, as untimely. Petitioner opposes, asserting that he is entitled to statutory and equitable tolling of the statute of limitations. For the reasons explained below, the court grants petitioner leave to file a declaration setting out more detailed facts to support his equitable tolling argument.

I. Procedural History

Petitioner was convicted of two counts of assault on a peace officer with a semiautomatic weapon while personally discharging a firearm, one court of false imprisonment by violence while personally using a firearm, one count of child endangerment, and one count of possession of a controlled substance. Lodg. Doc. 2. He was sentenced to 44 years 8 months in prison. Id.

On July 16, 2008, the California Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District, affirmed the judgment. Id. Petitioner's request for review in the California Supreme Court was denied on October 22, 2008. Lodg. Doc. 4.

On December 27, 2009,*fn1 petitioner filed a habeas petition in the California Supreme Court, which was denied on July 14, 2010 with a citation to In re Robbins, 18 Cal.4th 770, 780 (1998). Lodg. Doc. 6. The instant petition was filed on July 29, 2010. Dckt. No. 1.

II. Statute of Limitations

A one-year limitations period for seeking federal habeas relief begins to run from the latest of the date the judgment became final on direct review, the date on which a state-created impediment to filing is removed, the date the United States Supreme Court makes a new rule retroactively applicable to cases on collateral review, or the date on which the factual predicate of a claim could have been discovered through the exercise of due diligence. 28 U.S.C. § 2244(d)(1).

A. Statutory Tolling

There is no statutory tolling of the limitations period "from the time a final decision is issued on direct state appeal [to] the time the first state collateral challenge is filed . . . ." Nino v. Galaza, 183 F.3d 1003, 1006 (9th Cir. 1999). However, once a petitioner properly files a state post-conviction application the period is tolled, and remains tolled for the entire time that application is "pending." 28 U.S.C. § 2244(d)(2). "[A]n application is 'properly filed' when its delivery and acceptance are in compliance with the applicable laws and rules governing filings." Artuz v. Bennett, 531 U.S. 4, 8 (2000). In California, a properly filed post-conviction application is "pending" during the intervals between a lower court decision and filing a new petition in a higher court. Carey v. Saffold, 536 U.S. 214, 223 (2002). A federal habeas application does not provide a basis for statutory tolling. Duncan v. Walker, 533 U.S. 167, 181-82 (2001).

B. Equitable Tolling

The limitations period may also be equitably tolled where a habeas petitioner establishes two elements: (1) that he has been pursuing his rights diligently, and (2) that some extraordinary circumstance stood in his way. Pace v. DiGuglielmo, 544 U.S. 408, 418 (2005). The petitioner must show that "the extraordinary circumstances were the cause of his untimeliness and that the extraordinary circumstances made it impossible to file a petition on time." Ramirez v. Yates, 571 F.3d 993, 997 (9th Cir. 2009) (internal quotation marks & citations omitted).

Petitioner has the burden of showing facts entitling him to statutory and equitable tolling. Smith v. Duncan, 297 F.3d 809, 814 (9th Cir. 2002); Miranda v. Castro, 292 F.3d 1063, 1065 (9th Cir. 2002).

III. Analysis

In this case, the statute of limitations began to run when petitioner's conviction became final on direct review. See 28 U.S.C. § 2244(d)(1)(A). The California Supreme Court denied review on October 22, 2008. Lodg. Doc. 4. The conviction became "final" within the meaning of section 2244(d)(1)(A) when the time for filing a petition for writ of certiorari expired ninety days later, on January 20, 2009. Supreme Ct. R. 13; Bowen v. Roe, 188 F.3d 1157, 1158-59 (9th Cir. 1999). The one-year limitations period commenced running the following day. Patterson v. Stewart, 251 F.3d 1243, 1246 (9th Cir. 2001). Thus, petitioner had until January 21, 2010 to file his ...


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