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Francis W. Davis v. N. Ali

March 5, 2012

FRANCIS W. DAVIS, PLAINTIFF,
v.
N. ALI, ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



ORDER

Plaintiff is a state prisoner proceeding pro se with this civil rights action under 42 U.S.C. § 1983. In addition to filing a complaint, plaintiff has filed an application to proceed in forma pauperis. This proceeding was referred to this court by Local Rule 302 pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 636(b)(1) and is before the undersigned pursuant to plaintiff's consent. See E.D. Cal. Local Rules, Appx. A, at (k)(4).

I. Request to Proceed In Forma Pauperis

Plaintiff has requested leave to proceedin forma pauperis pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1915. Dckt. No. 6. Plaintiff's application makes the showing required by 28 U.S.C. § 1915(a)(1) and

(2). Accordingly, by separate order, the court directs the agency having custody of plaintiff to collect and forward the appropriate monthly payments for the filing fee as set forth in 28 U.S.C. § 1915(b)(1) and (2).

II. Screening Order

Federal courts must engage in a preliminary screening of cases in which prisoners seek redress from a governmental entity or officer or employee of a governmental entity. 28 U.S.C. § 1915A(a). The court must identify cognizable claims or dismiss the complaint, or any portion of the complaint, if the complaint "is frivolous, malicious, or fails to state a claim upon which relief may be granted," or "seeks monetary relief from a defendant who is immune from such relief." Id. § 1915A(b).

In order to avoid dismissal for failure to state a claim a complaint must contain more than "naked assertions," "labels and conclusions" or "a formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action." Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 555-557 (2007). In other words, "[t]hreadbare recitals of the elements of a cause of action, supported by mere conclusory statements do not suffice." Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 129 S. Ct. 1937, 1949 (2009).

Furthermore, a claim upon which the court can grant relief has facial plausibility. Twombly, 550 U.S. at 570. "A claim has facial plausibility when the plaintiff pleads factual content that allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged." Iqbal, 129 S. Ct. at 1949. When considering whether a complaint states a claim upon which relief can be granted, the court must accept the allegations as true, Erickson v. Pardus, 127 S. Ct. 2197, 2200 (2007), and construe the complaint in the light most favorable to the plaintiff, see Scheuer v. Rhodes, 416 U.S. 232, 236 (1974).

A pro se plaintiff must satisfy the pleading requirements of Rule 8(a) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Rule 8(a)(2) "requires a complaint to include a short and plain statement of the claim showing that the pleader is entitled to relief, in order to give the defendant fair notice of what the claim is and the grounds upon which it rests." Bell Atl. Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 554, 562-563 (2007) (citing Conley v. Gibson, 355 U.S. 41 (1957)).

The court has reviewed plaintiff's complaint pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1915A and finds it does not state a cognizable claim against any defendant for the following reasons.

Plaintiff names as defendants Ali and Rodgers, who are alleged to be prison officials at Mule Creek State Prison. Plaintiff alleges he has a serious heart condition and takes nitroglycerin pills for chest pains, and gabapentin for back pain. He claims that on January 17, 2010, he refused Ali's order to open his mouth wide so that Ali could determine whether plaintiff had in fact swallowed a gabapentin pill. Plaintiff claims Ali then searched his cell in retaliation for plaintiff's refusal to be humiliated. During the search of plaintiff's cell, Ali allegedly took plaintiff's nitroglycerin pills, two Bic pens, and foot cream. Ali allegedly refused to return plaintiff's nitroglycerin pills even though plaintiff informed Ali he needed it for chest pain. Nitroglycerin pills were allegedly reordered for plaintiff on January 28, 2010. Ali allegedly drafted a false rules violation report based upon this incident. Defendant Rodgers allegedly denied plaintiff a witness at the hearing on the rule violation, and plaintiff was found guilty. Plaintiff alleges Ali is prejudiced against African Americans.

A. Retaliatory Cell Search

Plaintiff alleges Ali searched plaintiff's cell in retaliation for plaintiff standing up for himself and not allowing Ali to humiliate him. To state a viable First Amendment retaliation claim, a prisoner must allege five elements: "(1) An assertion that a state actor took some adverse action against an inmate (2) because of (3) that prisoner's protected conduct, and that such action (4) chilled the inmate's exercise of his First Amendment rights, and (5) the action did not reasonably advance a legitimate correctional goal." Rhodes v. Robinson, 408 F.3d 559, 567-68 (9th Cir. 2005). Thus, to prevail on a retaliation claim, the prisoner "must show that the challenged action 'did not reasonably advance a legitimate correctional goal.'" Brodheim v. Cry, 584 F.3d 1262, 1271 (9th Cir. 2009) (quoting Rhodes, 408 F.3d at 568). Plaintiff fails to allege facts indicating that Ali's search of his cell was motivated by conduct protected under the First Amendment and did not reasonably advance a legitimate correctional goal.

Moreover, plaintiff has no Fourth Amendment right to freedom from a search of his cell. Hudson v. Palmer, 4 ...


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