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Peeler v. MacHado

United States District Court, E.D. California

April 10, 2015

BRICE A. PEELER, Plaintiff,
v.
MACHADO, et al., Defendants.

ORDER AND FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

CAROLYN K. DELANEY, Magistrate Judge.

Plaintiff is a California prisoner proceeding pro se with an action for violation of civil rights under 42 U.S.C. ยง 1983. He is proceeding with claims arising under the Fourth Amendment for excessive force against defendants Machado, West, Ross and Barnhart (defendants), who at all relevant times were employees of the Placer County Sheriff's Department. Two matters are before the court including defendants' motion for summary judgment as to plaintiff's claims against defendants Barnhart and Ross.[1]

I. Motion For Summary Judgment

A. Plaintiff's Claims

In his first amended complaint (ECF No. 25), which is signed under the penalty of perjury, plaintiff alleges as follows:

1. On September 19, 2012, plaintiff was taken into custody by defendants.

2. Defendants "violently, maliciously for the purpose of causing harm stomped, kicked, kneed, [and] drove with force plaintiff[]s head into the ground."

3. As a result of defendants' actions plaintiff received lacerations to his head and face, and "knots" behind his ears and the back of his head. He also had double vision, blurred vision, dizziness and headaches.

4. Plaintiff has received medical care at the Sacramento County Jail for injuries including evaluation by an eye specialist for double vision, blurred vision, dizziness and headaches.

B. Summary Judgment Standard

Summary judgment is appropriate when it is demonstrated that there "is no genuine dispute as to any material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law." Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(a). A party asserting that a fact cannot be disputed must support the assertion by "citing to particular parts of materials in the record, including depositions, documents, electronically stored information, affidavits or declarations, stipulations (including those made for purposes of the motion only), admissions, interrogatory answers, or other materials..." Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(c)(1)(A).

Summary judgment should be entered, after adequate time for discovery and upon motion, against a party who fails to make a showing sufficient to establish the existence of an element essential to that party's case, and on which that party will bear the burden of proof at trial. See Celotex Corp. v. Catrett, 477 U.S. 317, 322 (1986). "[A] complete failure of proof concerning an essential element of the nonmoving party's case necessarily renders all other facts immaterial." Id.

If the moving party meets its initial responsibility, the burden then shifts to the opposing party to establish that a genuine issue as to any material fact actually does exist. See Matsushita Elec. Indus. Co. v. Zenith Radio Corp., 475 U.S. 574, 586 (1986). In attempting to establish the existence of this factual dispute, the opposing party may not rely upon the allegations or denials of their pleadings but is required to tender evidence of specific facts in the form of affidavits, and/or admissible discovery material, in support of its contention that the dispute exists or show that the materials cited by the movant do not establish the absence of a genuine dispute. See Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(c); Matsushita, 475 U.S. at 586 n.11. The opposing party must demonstrate that the fact in contention is material, i.e., a fact that might affect the outcome of the suit under the governing law, see Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 248 (1986); T.W. Elec. Serv., Inc. v. Pacific Elec. Contractors Ass'n, 809 F.2d 626, 630 (9th Cir. 1987), and that the dispute is genuine, i.e., the evidence is such that a reasonable jury could return a verdict for the nonmoving party, see Wool v. Tandem Computers, Inc., 818 F.2d 1433, 1436 (9th Cir. 1987).

In the endeavor to establish the existence of a factual dispute, the opposing party need not establish a material issue of fact conclusively in its favor. It is sufficient that "the claimed factual dispute be shown to require a jury or judge to resolve the parties' differing versions of the truth at trial." T.W. Elec. Serv., 809 F.2d at 631. Thus, the "purpose of summary judgment is to pierce the pleadings and to assess the proof in order to see whether there is a ...


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